HomeNewsFeaturesDisplay

Base social workers aim to make life better for Robins

Tracy Snider, 78th Medical Group, Family Advocacy treatment manager, fits Staff Sgt. Demica McIntosh, Mental Health NCOIC, with an empathy belt used in the organization’s
dad’s class. The class, designed for new fathers, is lead by other fathers and is offered quarterly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Tracy Snider, 78th Medical Group, Family Advocacy treatment manager, fits Staff Sgt. Demica McIntosh, Mental Health NCOIC, with an empathy belt used in the organization’s dad’s class. The class, designed for new fathers, is lead by other fathers and is offered quarterly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Life is full of challenges, and in Robin's Mental Health Clinic and Family Advocacy Program, there are eight military and civilian social workers skilled to help people overcome their difficulties and make life better.

Tandra Hunter, 78th Medical Operations Squadron's Family Advocacy Program Outreach Program manager, said the base's social workers are available to help the base community.

"Social workers are trained to work in every type of setting," she said. "Robins' Mental Health social workers provide assessments and therapy in the evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders. 

"In Family Advocacy, they interview victims, offenders, children and family members regarding allegations of abuse or neglect," she added. "They also provide crisis intervention services and appropriate triage to assist in the protection and safety of victims and families."

Social workers here conduct prevention classes and workshops in an effort to minimize high-risk behavior and reduce family violence. 

Other contract-based social workers serve in numerous areas base-wide.

Social workers may not repair aircraft or take to     the skies, but they're essential to mission readiness, Hunter said.

"Social workers believe society can be a better place for all its members," she said. "They fight hard to strengthen individuals to meet their challenging and changing roles in today's military and society."

Hunter said social work isn't for everyone.

"Social work isn't easy; they must be compassionate but tough and smart but caring," she said. "Social workers help both individuals and communities find better ways to live together and address problems that arise whenever individuals have conflicts or problems."

These professionals fulfill an integral role in the armed forces that helps to keep its people ready.

"Social workers are very diverse and take pride in helping others in all walks of life," Hunter said. "Robins' social workers are very talented and they have amazing tenacity."

Editor's note: For more information on social workers, visit http://www.naswnc.org/?287.