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Getting to know you: Justin Reeves

Getting to know you: Justin Reeves (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Claude Lazzara)

Getting to know you: Justin Reeves (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Claude Lazzara)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- This week our Getting to Know You feature highlights Justin Reeves, Automatic Test Systems Division executive officer.

Time in service: 5 years
Hometown: Carrollton, Ga.

What does your work involve at Robins? "My work at Robins involves managing the security, emergency management, personnel, facility management, and Continuity of Operations Programs for the Automatic Test Systems Division. On a typical day you will find me doing anything from processing personnel actions or security visits to war-gaming emergency management scenarios with our mission partners here."

What do you enjoy most about your work? "The variety of people and career fields I get to work with. Every day is a little bit different and you're always being blessed with new opportunities to grow and help people at different stages of their careers."

How does your work contribute to the Robins mission? "My office helps to support the warfighter by taking care of all of the "care and feeding" aspects of our organization. We handle business operations for ATS so that our personnel can focus on getting test systems back to the warfighter in the field and know that we have their backs whenever a business operations need is identified."

What prompted your interest in your current career field? "My mentors Professor Clif Wilkinson and Dr. Jerry Herbel at Georgia College. Professor Wilkinson convinced me to pursue my Masters in Public Administration and Dr. Herbel was a huge proponent of the co-op programs at Robins."

Who has been the biggest influence in your life? "My parents. My dad taught us the value of honesty, loyalty, and integrity at home and in civil service while he was the sheriff of Carroll County. My mom reinforced those values with a deep and abundant faith that taught us that doing what was right wasn't always the easiest course of action."