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National Children’s Dental Health Month

National Children’s Dental Health Month

Children participated in the “Tooth Walk” game at the Robins Children's Development Center during a visit by staff from the 78th Dental Squadron, Robins Air Force Base February 20th. When the music stopped playing, if a child had a star under the tooth they landed on they were asked a dental health question. (US Air Force photo by Misuzu Allen)

National Children’s Dental Health Month

Tech. Sgt Justin Rescina, NCOIC of Dental Logistics, 78th Dental Squadron, Robins Air Force Base shows the proper way to brush and floss during a visit to the Robins Children's Development Center February 20th. Children’s teeth are meant to last a lifetime, and a healthy smile is important to a child’s self-esteem. With proper care, a balanced diet and regular dental visits, their teeth can remain healthy and strong. (US Air Force photo by Misuzu Allen)

National Children’s Dental Health Month

Lisa Sims, preventive dentistry manager, 78th Dental Squadron, Robins Air Force Base, explains the importance of proper oral hygiene and nutritional habits during a visit to the Robins Children's Development Center February 20th. Children’s teeth are meant to last a lifetime, and a healthy smile is important to a child’s self-esteem. With proper care, a balanced diet and regular dental visits, their teeth can remain healthy and strong. (US Air Force photo by Misuzu Allen)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

The staff of the 78th Dental Squadron, Robins Air Force Base celebrates National Children's Dental Health month with younger members of Team Robins at the Robins Children's Development Center

Lisa Sims, preventive dentistry manager, 78th Dental Squadron, Robins Air Force Base, and Tech. Sgt Justin Rescina, NCOIC of Dental Logistics, visited the CDC to educate the children on proper oral hygiene and nutritional habits.

The children learned how often to visit the dentist, how to choose the proper snacks and what they can do to prevent decay such as Fluoride and sealants. Each child participated in the “Tooth Walk” game. When the music stopped playing, if a child had a star under the tooth they landed on they were ask a dental health question.

“Oral health habits are something that has to be taught to children at an early age so that good hygiene and nutritional habits become habits. It is important for the dental community to educate both children and parents on ways to keep their teeth healthy,” said Sims.

Children’s teeth are meant to last a lifetime, and a healthy smile is important to a child’s self-esteem. With proper care, a balanced diet and regular dental visits, their teeth can remain healthy and strong. 

It is important for parents to take their children to a preliminary dental visit before the child reaches their first birthday.  The first visit can help educate the parents on ways to help their child prevent dental decay at an early age and subsequent dental problems throughout their lives.