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ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Your college, vo-tech training and experience could qualify you for a position at Robins Air Force Base. Below is a brief description of what some of the jobs on base and their responsibilities. 

Sheet Metal Mechanic (Aircraft):  This job-grading standard covers nonsupervisory jobs involved in the repair, fabrication, modification, and installation of sheet metal parts, items and assemblies. To apply on USA Jobs, click here or copy and paste this link in your browser: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/451533400/

Aircraft Mechanic: This standard is used to grade all nonsupervisory jobs involved in the maintenance, troubleshooting, repair, overhaul and modification of fixed and rotary wing aircraft systems, airframes, components and assemblies. The work requires substantive knowledge of the airframe and aircraft mechanical, pneudraulic,and/or electrical systems and their interrelationships. Some work situations within this series may require varying levels of electronics knowledge. To apply for this job on USA Jobs, click here or copy and paste this link in your browser:  https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/445574200/.

Painter:  This standard is used to grade all nonsupervisory jobs involved in applying coating materials -- for example, paint, varnish, lacquer, shellac, epoxy resin and Teflon -- on wood, metal, glass, synthetic, concrete and other surfaces. This coating work is done with brushes, rollers, spray guns, and other related methods and techniques, and is performed on the insides and outsides of buildings, aircraft, vessels, mobile equipment, fittings, furnishings, machinery and other surfaces. To apply for this job on USA Jobs, click here or copy and paste this link in your browser: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/451533400/.

And, If those jobs don't fit the bill, here are just a few more of the careers at Robins Air Force Base:

Aircraft Electrician: This standard is used to grade nonsupervisory work involved in installing, troubleshooting, adjusting, testing, modifying, calibrating and repairing aircraft electrical systems and equipment on board conventional and non-conventional aircraft such as electrical power control and distribution systems, lighting systems, refueling and fuel quantity indicating systems, electrical warning, controlling, and actuating circuits, and tying-in power and control circuits for functional systems, such as hydraulics, armament, radar, engines, and fire suppression. The work is characterized by the need to understand the functional characteristics and relationships of various electrical systems and equipment on aircraft. 

Aircraft Engine Mechanic: This standard provides grading criteria for all nonsupervisory work performing maintenance, troubleshooting, repair, overhaul, modification, and testing of conventional, modified, and experimental aircraft engines, their components, assemblies and subassemblies. This standard also covers work involving engine accessories such as starters, generators, anti-icers, and fuel control devices when such assignments are incidental to work on the completed engine. Some work situations within this series may require varying levels of electronics knowledge.

Pneudraulic Systems Mechanic: This standard covers nonsupervisory work involved in the repair, modification, test, and maintenance of hydraulic and pneumatic systems and components that actuate mechanisms or produce, control, and regulate fluid flow. The work requires knowledge of the physical principles governing the behavior of fluids (liquids and gases) as they pertain to hydraulic and pneumatic systems and components; knowledge of basic electrical and mechanical principles; knowledge of repair procedures, methods, and trade practices; the ability to test for and isolate malfunctions in hydraulic and pneumatic systems or components; and the skill to disassemble, repair, and reassemble such devices. Mechanics work on many different work units at various times and may rotate from modifying, repairing, and rebuilding to testing and troubleshooting assignments.

Non-Destructive Tester: This occupation includes jobs involved in the nondestructive examination of metals, composites, ceramics, plastics, and other materials for internal and external structural defects, delaminations, corrosion, and moisture penetration using magnetic particle, liquid penetrant, eddy current, radiographic, ultrasonic, or other types of nondestructive test processes and equipment. The work includes equipment setup, operation, adjustment, and evaluation or interpretation of test readings or results within established parameters for acceptance or rejection. This occupation does not include jobs that primarily require: (1) journey level knowledge and skill of the work processes involved in producing or repairing the items or materials tested; or (2) technical knowledge of engineering, physical, or other sciences in the direct support of laboratory or research operations.

Machinist: This standard covers nonsupervisory work involved in the manufacture of parts and items of equipment from castings, forgings, and other raw stocks made of various metals, metal alloys, and other materials, and/or machining operations required in the repair of such items. The work requires the use of various types of conventional and/or computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools and their attachments to perform machining operations in the repair and/or manufacture of parts from raw stock. The work performed by machine tool operators requires basic knowledge of machining processes and skill in performing machining operations such as boring, drilling, planing, milling, and turning on milling machines, radial, or multiple spindle drill presses, shapers, planers, lathes, or equivalent types of conventional and/or CNC machine tools. The work performed by machinists requires skill in the initial planning of necessary work sequences, laying out reference points and lines to be followed in the machining processes, planning for and setting up the work in the machine, sometimes programming the cutter path, selecting and shaping metal cutting tools and inserts, operating all types of machine tools, and performing precision handwork to fit, finish, and assemble machined parts and equipment. The work also requires knowledge of the makeup of blueprints and drawings and the skill necessary to interpret them; and skill in working from other types of specifications such as sketches, models of parts to be manufactured, or work orders.

Composite Fabricator: This job grading standard covers nonsupervisory jobs involved in the repair, fabrication, modification, removal, and installation of composite and/or plastic items, parts, assemblies, and structures.

Electronics Engineer: This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving electronic circuits, circuit elements, equipment, systems, and associated phenomena concerned with electromagnetic or acoustical wave energy or electrical information for purposes such as communication, computation, sensing, control, measurement, and navigation.

Electronics Technician: This series covers positions that require: (1) the knowledge of the techniques and theories characteristic of electronics such as a knowledge of basic electricity and electronic theory, algebra, and elementary physics; (2) the ability to apply that knowledge to duties involved in engineering functions such as design, development, evaluation, testing, installation and maintenance of electronic equipment; and (3) a knowledge of the capabilities, limitations, operations, design characteristics, and functional use of a variety of types and models of electronic equipment and systems. Such knowledge is related to but less than a full professional knowledge of electronics engineering.

 

FOR ENGINEERING POSITIONS BELOW:

(All interested in applying should send resumes to Thurmasia Jackson by email to: wralc.enrw.enrylevap@us.af.mil.  

Electrical Engineers (Aircraft): Aircraft electronics engineers provide engineering services required to sustain Air Force aircraft: F-15, C-130, C-5, C-17, E-8, Special Operations, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and investigate user deficiency/safety reports and develop/design technical solutions.  Avionics electronics engineers provide engineering services required to sustain Air Force Electronic Warfare, Communication, Navigation, Radar, and Sensor systems and investigate user deficiency/safety reports and develop/design technical solutions.  These engineers also work with the supply system managers to resolve obsolete parts, manufacturing, and other spare acquisition problems while providing repair instructions and guidance to aircraft and avionics maintenance personnel.

Electrical Engineers (Avionics):  Avionics electronics engineers provide engineering services required to sustain Air Force Electronic Warfare, Communication, Navigation, Radar, and Sensor systems and investigate user deficiency/safety reports and develop/design technical solutions.  These engineers also work with the supply system managers to resolve obsolete parts, manufacturing, and other spare acquisition problems while providing repair instructions and guidance to aircraft and avionics maintenance personnel.

 

 

Electronics Engineers, Computer Engineers, and Computer Scientists (Software): Software scientists and engineers support Air Force aircraft/avionics systems that provide software engineering services required to sustain Air Force aircraft (F-15, C-130, C-5, C-17, E-8, Special Operations, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)) and support Air Force avionics systems (Electronic Warfare, Communication, Navigation, Radar, and Sensors).  These engineers investigate user software deficiency/safety reports and develop/design technical solutions while working with the aircraft customers and system engineers, define aircraft/avionics software modification requirements needed to meet new mission requirements.

 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers:  These engineers provide worldwide engineering and logistics management for the Air Logistics Complex's assigned aircraft, systems, and support/test equipment. These may include UAV's, F-15, C-17, C-130, C-5, Special Operation Forces aircraft, ground support equipment/vehicles and armament systems.  Engineers in these areas also provide engineering support for aircraft undergoing heavy maintenance. Work may include repair analysis; modification, redesign, prototyping and testing.

 

Industrial Engineers: Industrial engineers develop and oversee the processes and facilities for repairing Air Force aircraft and manufacturing/repairing aircraft structural and electronics components. Working with the systems engineers and maintenance personnel, industrial engineers define the process/facility requirements, develop technical requirements, cost estimates, project plans, and contract/work requirements while designing or supervising the design and installation of manufacturing/repair processes and facilities.  

 

CONTRACTING POSITIONS BELOW:

All interested in applying should send resumes to Ted Lamb at wralc.pkxa.personnel@us.af.mil.

Contract Specialist:  Air Force Contract Specialists provide contracting support for base operations (services, construction, or aircraft maintenance), supply chain management, vehicles, support equipment, armament, and a variety of Air Force aircraft that includes F-15, C-130, C-5, C-17, Special Operations, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV).  Contract Specialists bid and award federal contracts to purchase equipment, components, spare parts, data, repair, maintenance, and modification of services in support of a weapon of comparable system or major subsystem.  Specific duties may include conducting market research, participating in acquisition planning; drafting provisions and clauses; developing data for use in negotiations; negotiating with contractors; monitoring contractor performance; negotiating proposals and preparing modifications; and/or resolving and disposing contract audit recommendations.   

Contract Price/Cost Analyst:  Air Force Contract Price/Cost Analysts provide support to Contract Specialists by engaging with negotiations on contracts to determine a fair and reasonable market price for the purchase of equipment, components, spare parts, data, repair, maintenance, and modification of services in support of base operations (services, construction, or aircraft maintenance), supply chain management, vehicles, support equipment, armament, and a variety of Air Force aircraft that includes F-15, C-130, C-5, C-17, Special Operations, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Contract Price/Cost analysts are actively involved in contract negotiations and apply complex pricing strategies and techniques in determining fair and reasonable pricing for federal contracts.

 

Qualifications: Interested candidates must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and have completed at least 24 semester hours in any combination of the following fields: accounting, business, finance, law, contracts, purchasing, economics, industrial management, marketing, quantitative methods or organization and management.

Team Robins has a worldwide impact every single day. Whether it’s supporting humanitarian and war efforts by maintaining aircraft and software, providing personnel and supplies, caring for Airmen and our families, or providing vital combat Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance  and tactical communication capabilities ... Team Robins drives success.

Don't you want to be part of it?

Editor's note: For more information on navigating USA jobs, watch the video on Youtube by copying and pasting this link: www.youtube.com/watch?v-8BicxsWEY6c&feature=share in your browser. To search for other jobs, visit www.usajobs.gov.