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Shockwave to bring heat at Thunder Over Georgia Air Show

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Chris Darnell drives the Shockwave Jet Truck at the 2019 Thunder and Lightning Over Arizona Airshow and Open House at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., March 24. Shockwave is a custom-built race truck equipped with three J34-48 Pratt & Whitney jet engines, and can reach speeds exceeding 350 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kristine Legate)

At a Glance:

◾Gates open at 9 a.m.
◾Opening ceremonies start at 10 a.m.
◾Admission and parking are free in designated areas.
◾Times and performances are subject to change.

WHAT TO KNOW: The #ThunderOverGeorgia2019 air show is going to be action packed this year! Make sure to bookmark www.robins.af.mil/airshow for all the latest – from performers to tips and parking. Mark your calendars now for Sept. 28 and 29, 2019. Find out more on the Robins Air Force Base website at: https://www.robins.af.mil, and you can follow the air show on Facebook at facebook.com/RobinsPublicAffairs.

 

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, GA. – The Shockwave Jet Truck demonstration team has a lot going on keeping their high speed vehicles ready for this year’s air show circuit.

And, if you’re planning on attending the Thunder Over Georgia Air Show Sept. 28 and 29 at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, you’ll get to see the fruits of their labors.

The team is adding new brakes, tires and parachutes to stop their vehicles. They’re also adding new paint and graphics to the beasts to make them pretty, while performing jet engine maintenance to make lots of fire and smoke – a hallmark of their performance.

Oh yeah, and the maintenance ensures they’re fast … really fast.

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ShockWave, a jet-powered truck, fires up its engine during the Warriors Over the Wasatch Air and Space Show June 23, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The three jet engines attached to the truck come from a U.S. Navy T-2 Buckeye and produce 21,000 pounds of thrust that can propel it to speeds over 350 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by David Perry)
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ShockWave, a jet-powered truck, fires up its engine during the Warriors Over the Wasatch Air and Space Show June 23, 2018, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The three jet engines attached to the truck come from a U.S. Navy T-2 Buckeye and produce 21,000 pounds of thrust that can propel it to speeds over 350 miles per hour. (U.S. Air Force photo by David Perry)
Photo By: David Perry
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SHOCKWAVE Jet Truck:
Shockwave is a custom-built race truck equipped with three huge J34-48 Pratt & Whitney Jet Engines originally out of the Navy’s T2 Buckeye.

The combined horsepower is 36,000, and the three engines create a total of 21,000 pounds of thrust which easily propel the truck to speeds faster than 350 mph. According to the team’s website, Shockwave is not only the most powerful truck in the world, it also holds the record speed for semi-trucks at 376 mph.

As one of the most popular air show and drag racing exhibition vehicles in the world, the Shockwave performance is not something you will soon forget.

This is truly an assault of all of your senses with huge flames coming out of the three after-burning jet engines, fire shooting out of the smoke stacks, intense heat, deafening noise and speed.

Shockwave is owned by Darnell Racing Enterprises, Inc., based in Springfield, Missouri, and driven by Chris Darnell.

AFTERSHOCK Jet Fire Truck:
This 1940 Ford Fire Truck boasts twin Rolls-Royce Bristol Viper Jet Engines totaling more than 24,000 horsepower and holds the Guinness World Record for Fire Trucks at an amazing 407 mph.

Flash Fire Jet Trucks:
The Flash Fire Jet Truck has a fire-breathing 12,000 horsepower jet engine and reaches speeds exceeding 350 mph! You will be amazed by the amount of fire, smoke, heat, noise and speed of this awesome jet truck driven by Neal Darnell. According to the website, Flash Fire will actually race an airplane giving it a 150-mph head start and pass it like it's stopped. 

Editor’s note: All acts are subject to change.