Airman Ninja Warrior: Robins captain gets shot on prime time TV series

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, shows off her human flag pose. Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, shows off her human flag pose. Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, lifts a large tire as part of her training.  Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, lifts a large tire as part of her training. Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, does a back flip as part of her training.  Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, does a back flip as part of her training. Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, uses the monkey bars as a grip strength training tool.  Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, uses the monkey bars as a grip strength training tool. Green recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

Capt. Kali Green, 5th Combat Communications Support Squadron flight commander, recently competed in the television competition series American Ninja Warrior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tommie Horton)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Already a military warrior, Capt. Kali Green was at an out-of-town training session when she got a call from the producers of the NBC show American Ninja Warrior.

Filmed June 5 through 7 in San Padro, California, the episode featuring former and current military members will air Monday.

"I was a last minute add," said Green, a flight commander for the 5th Combat Communication Squadron.

She has competed in ninja warrior events locally but never for television.

A few of her friends who have tried out for the show told her the military episode was short-handed.

She doesn't know whether she will be featured on TV or not because she wasn't training to be on the show.

"I had no training and I was not going into this in good shape," Green said.

American Ninja Warrior is in its seventh season.

"The series follows competitors as they tackle a series of challenging obstacle courses in both city qualifying and city finals rounds across the country," according to the NBC website.

Each city has 100 participants. Qualifying warriors have a chance of going to Las Vegas and winning $1 million.

Green graduated from the Air Force Academy in 2009 and is originally from Seattle.

She took 10 years of gymnastics when she was younger, which she said helps give her strength, balance and a good foundation. She can do back flips, hand stands and a human flag.

When asked what drives her to compete she said wanting to constantly challenge herself and others.

"It is crazy how much potential each of us has and how capable we truly are," she said. We often hold ourselves back from trying new activities for one reason or another.  So, it is really rewarding watching someone try an obstacle for the first time, whether they complete it or not; they have succeeded in taking the chance. I'd encourage everyone to give it a shot. You will definitely surprise yourself, and you may even get hooked on it."  

Other training prospective warriors should do is rock climbing and bouldering, a free climb under 20-25 feet without ropes or safety harnesses.

Just this week, Green participated in a 5K ruck run with a 45 lb. ruck sack on her back. She also does an exercise called a salmon ladder where a person hangs on a bar and progressively swings and moves the bar further up the rungs.

"I'm nothing special; I don't have any abilities that you cannot have as well," she said.  "So, the only thing making these obstacles appear impossible is you." 

Although Green enjoyed her time at the competition, she doesn't believe she will participate anymore as she is camera shy.

"I'll run the course all day long minus the cameras," she said.