Heavy traffic: Base, community team for aircraft relocation

Traffic crawls along behind a C-130H trainer and an F-84F Thunderstreak being towed down Ga. Highway 247 March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

Traffic crawls along behind a C-130H trainer and an F-84F Thunderstreak being towed down Ga. Highway 247 March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

Master Sgt. David Rueling, 402nd Expeditionary Maintenance section chief, speaks with Lt. Clay Chambers of the Houston County Sheriff’s Office, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

Master Sgt. David Rueling, 402nd Expeditionary Maintenance section chief, speaks with Lt. Clay Chambers of the Houston County Sheriff’s Office, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

An Air National Guard F-84F Thunderstreak is towed down Ga. Highway 247 to the Museum of Aviation, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

An Air National Guard F-84F Thunderstreak is towed down Ga. Highway 247 to the Museum of Aviation, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

Houston County Sheriff’s Office personnel escort the C-130 trainer as it heads to its final destination, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

Houston County Sheriff’s Office personnel escort the C-130 trainer as it heads to its final destination, March 25, 2016. (U. S. Air Force photo by Roland Leach)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Traffic heading south on Ga. Highway 247 was slow going March 25 as a C-130 was towed from the flight line to a training field.

An Air National Guard F-84F Thunderstreak joined the journey on the back on a flatbed truck - to its final destination - the Museum of Aviation.

According to Senior Master Sgt. David Gurzynski, 402nd Expeditionary Maintenance Aircraft Battle Damage Repair chief, the aircraft, which arrived at Robins Sept. 29, was originally slated for the boneyard in Arizona. Instead it will be used here by the 373rd Training Squadron, Det. 6.

Members of Robins, the Houston County Sheriff's Office and the Georgia Department of Transportation teamed up to make the move happen in a little less than an hour.

The move required a lot of moving parts, Gurzynski said.

"We just got a lot of support and took it south," he said.

"We didn't have any problems. Everything went really smooth," said Capt. Ricky Harlowe, Houston County Sheriff's Office division commander.

There were seven sheriff's office employees who helped to divert traffic from the Aero Club Gate to the museum's back gate, which was a distance of about 3.2 miles.

At the museum, the plane was a little delayed due to trees near the gate.

"It was a really close fit," Gurzynski said.

Security was posted during the opening of each entrance.

Harlowe said drivers were patient while waiting for the plane to be moved.

"That's an exciting event for the community. People stop and take pictures," Harlowe said.